Queens Art Intervention 2017

Niizeki Hiromi

Dwelling with Thousands Windows Project 

Long Island City 

Location: Murray Playground >> map

“Dwelling with Thousands Windows" is a participatory art installation made of window envelopes of many shapes, sizes, and colors, collected by the artist in the past years and donated from the community for this project. The audience will communicate and work together to complete the day's “dwelling” by adding "Windows" with glue and color with paint at the site.

 

Over two decades ago, I started to collect junk-snail-mails to make handmade paper mache. Plastic windows, which is essential for this installation, are bi-products of handmade paper mache. The nature of the materials: transparency, strength as well as flexibility, natural sound they create, the colors and designs which reflect the envelopes’ original purposes, has led me to create a series of installations with them. This installation will be continuing my investigation into the complexity of materials.

2-8 pm (Will work under sun light and with light of lantern. Expected sunset time is 6:50pm)

Biography

Niizeki Hiromi (Niizeki is her family name) is a visual artist, whose installations, often participatory, embody her interest in dealing with reality of our everyday life.

 

Hiromi's work has exhibited both domestically and internationally at art institutions which include; The National Museum of Art in Johannesburg, South Africa, Palo Alto Junior Museum, Palo Alto, CA, Memorial Art Gallery, The University of Rochester, Rochester, NY, Highways Performance and Arts, Los Angels, CA, Cave, Brooklyn, NY, La Foret Museum, Tokyo, Japan. 

 

Her work has reviewed by art critics such as; Holland Cotter of The New York Times, Stuart Ferguson of the Wall Street Journal and Jane Ingram Allen for Sculpture Magazine. The participated Arts Residencies include Clock Tower Gallery/PS1 Contemporary Art Center, New York and Governors Island Studio Program at Children's Museum of the Arts, New York. 

 

She began her studies at Musashino Art University in her native Tokyo before moving to New York City in 1988 as her primary residence. 

Artist's website

www.niizekihiromi.com

This program is funded by:

Councilmember Funding